Representing Place

Artists for discussion: April 15

Posted in artists, maps by Owen on April 14, 2010


iSee

Nato Thompson

Matthew Coolidge (CLUI)


ARTISODE 2.1 Matthew Coolidge and The Center for Land Use Interpretation


CLUI: Tour of the Urban Oilscape of Los Angeles (Part 1)


CLUI: Terminal Island Tour Part 1


CLUI: Terminal Island Tour Part 2


John Welchman
http://visarts.ucsd.edu/user/view/52
http://www.artbook.com/3905770555.html
http://www.artbook.com/3905701650.html

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Artists for discussion: April 7

Posted in artists, maps by Owen on April 6, 2010

For the first class of the final unit, on place-situated art, we’ll be discussing readings by Kwon, Suderburg, and Rogoff. These are the first three readings in the Unit V section under the Readings tab in Blackboard. For April 14, we’ll be reading the one other reading currently on Blackboard (by John Welchman) plus two other readings that haven’t yet been posted plus selections from the Thompson Experimental Geography book.

WEEK 1

  • Miwon Kwon, One Place after Another (2004): “Sitings of Public Art.”
  • Erika Suderburg, ed., Space, Site, Intervention (2000): Chapter Erika Suderburg (“Written on the West”).
  • Rogoff, Irit – Mapping in Terra Infirma (2000)

WEEK 2

  • Nato Thompson, Experimental Geography (2008): “Rich in Reference” by Jeffrey Kastner, “Landscape is a Metaphor” by Matthew Coolidge, “Research and Development” by Iain Kerr, & “We Are the City” by Damon Rich.
  • Matthew Coolidge, “The Trans-Alaska Pipeline” in Artforum (2008).
  • Andrea Robbins & Max Becher, The Transportation of Place (2006): Excerpts TBD.
  • Erika Suderburg, ed., Space, Site, Intervention (2000): Chapter by John Welchman (“Public Art and the Spectacle of Money”)

Artists for the April 7 class

Simon Patterson, The Grear Bear

Mona Hatoum, Present Tense

Joshua Neustein, Nature Morte

Houston Conwill, The New Cakewalk Manifesto: A Cultural Libation (1989)

White People Can Dance!!! a brief segment of the brilliant “Funk Lessons” by Adrian Piper, as shown at Nuit Blanche 2007, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

More information here
http://www.artforum.com/film/id=24753

Richard Serra, Titled Arc
http://www.sfmoma.org/multimedia/videos/90

Michael Asher, Untitled Document

Andrea Fraser

Michael Heizer, Double Negative

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Denis Wood visit and lecture

Posted in artists, maps by Owen on March 29, 2010

Denis Wood is one of the world’s leading scholars researching the link between cartographic and artistic design and is the author of several books including “The Power of Maps” and “Making Maps: A Visual Guide to Map Design for GIS.”  His talk on Friday will focus in particular on the historic and conceptual links between, on the one hand, academic research in spatial cognition, behavioral geography, and perceptions of place and, on the other hand, artistic movements of the 1960s and 1970s that sought to capture (and intervene in) the process of moving through the urban landscape.  This talk will be held at the usual colloquium TimeSpace (2:30 in Bellamy 116).

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Christoph Niemann

Posted in maps by Owen on March 20, 2010
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Ingrid Calame

Posted in student presentations by joshmehler on February 17, 2010

#231 Drawing (Tracings up to the L.A. River placed in the Clark Telescope Dome, Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ)

From #231 Drawing (Tracings up to the L.A. River placed in the Clark Telescope Dome, Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ)

Ingrid Calame is a Los Angeles-based artist whose work attempts to document “the lowly visual remains of human activity” by tracing everyday marks of human presence (Harmon 106).  In the examples shown here, Calame has traced the marks found in the Los Angeles river bed—including graffiti, stains, and other human marks—and has then overlaid tracings that record the regularized physical movements of people who work in the observatory. Calame has also done extensive tracings of skid marks at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and areas of the trading floor at the New York Stock Exchange. In all her work is an awareness of the passing through of human activity, driven by a desire to record human presence. At the same time, however, her work emphasizes the difficulty of capturing that human presence in various spaces.

My question then is: does this work fit in with a definition of “map”? Do these works count as “maps”?

Yes: Katharine Harmon seems to think so; she argues that Calame’s work fits into a definition of maps as “simplified representations of the Earth’s surface or depictions of relationships between the components of a space” and that it “documents the relationship between humans and their environments” (106).  Might Calame’s work also fit under the heading of “new cartography” that Deleuze has observed? That is: “a mode of spatial thinking that sought not to trace out representations of the real, but to construct mappings that refigure relations in ways that render alternate epistemologies and very different ways of world making” (Cobarrubias and Pickles 40)?

No: The artist herself claims that she does not see her work as “maps” but, regardless, it does arise from a “cartographic desire to know the world.” So should we then define a “map” as any document or work of art that arises from this similar desire? How is a “cartographic” desire different from any other desire to know the world?

One Week of Missed Connections… NYT

Posted in maps by Owen on February 14, 2010

A lovely “mapping” combining temporal, geographic, and emotional spaces. Found at:
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/02/14/opinion/20100214logan.html

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Images for discussion: Feb 10

Posted in artists, maps by Owen on February 9, 2010

First, read three introductions to art and cartography

  • C. D’Ignazio, “Cartography and Art” in the International Encyclopedia of Human Geography
  • Denis Wood, “Map Art” in Cartographic Perspectives (pp. 5-14)
  • Dalia Varanka “Interpreting Map Art” in Cartographic Perspectives (pp. 15-23)

Then, read three essays by (or about) artists who work with cartographic art

  • kanarinka, “Art Machines” in Cartographic Perspectives (pp. 24-40)
  • John Krygier, “Jake Barton’s Performance Maps” in Cartographic Perspectives (pp. 41-50)

Also, during this class session students will give brief statements about what they plan to do for their Unit III projects/papers.

White People Can Dance!!! a brief segment of the brilliant “Funk Lessons” by Adrian Piper, as shown at Nuit Blanche 2007, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

More information here
http://www.artforum.com/film/id=24753

Mona Hatoum, Map, 1998
glass marbles, Basel.

Bukhara (red and white)«, 2008 by Mona Hatoum

Mona Hatoum

Teddy Cruz

Teddy Cruz

Teddy Cruz

Teddy Cruz, Paisaje urbano Tijuana, ca. 2006, Teddy Cruz

Teddy Cruz

Javier Tellez, One Flew Over the Void (Bala perdida), inSite 05. Photo: Alfredo De Stefano, courtesy inSite 05

William H. Whyte, The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces

Andy Warhol, Map of Eastern U.S.S.R. Missile Bases, 1985 – 1986

Hellen Mayer Harrison and Newton Harrison, Peninsula Europe: The Rising of waters, the trajectory of drought, 2007.

Swoon

Walid Raad and The Atlas Group, My Neck Is Thinner Than a Hair (plate 2-7-88S), 2004, inkjet print, 20 X 25 cm (courtesy of The Atlas Group / Sfeir Semler Galerie / Anthony Reynolds Gallery; photo © Walid Raad).

Walid Raad and The Atlas Group, Already Been in a Lake of Fire (plates 57 and 58), 2004, inkjet print, 30 X 40 cm (courtesy of The Atlas Group / Sfeir Semler Galerie / Anthony Reynolds Gallery; photo © Walid Raad)

One Block Radius by Glowlab

floatingsheep.org

Posted in maps by Owen on February 9, 2010

Folks may be interested in the blog floatingsheep.org,  a website where people post user-generated maps. The mapping itself is pretty conventional, but the data’s interesting. For instance, here you can find confirmation of something that you’ve probably always suspected when driving through the U.S. landscape: there’s a strong correlation between churches, strip clubs, gun ownership, and bowling alleys, all of which are negatively correlated with bookstores.

For less conventional place representation, I’d like to add to Mauro’s suggestion of the Urban Hacking site (which he distributed a few days ago) the BldgBlog website, bldgblog.blogspot.com. There’s not any easy way to describe this website, but I guess the simplest is that it’s at the intersection of architecture and futurism, with a light-to-moderate dose of social criticism.

—Phil

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Images for discussion: Feb 3

Posted in maps by Owen on February 3, 2010

Readings for this week:

  • Don Mitchell, Cultural Geography (2000): Chapter 5 (“Metaphors to Live By”).
  • Denis Wood, The Power of Maps (1992): Chapter 4 (“The Interest the Map Serves is Masked”).
  • Rob Kitchin & Martin Dodge, “Rethinking Maps” in Progress in Human Geography (2007).
  • Vincent DelCasino & Stephen Hanna, “Beyond the ‘Binaries’” in ACME (2005).
  • Michael Brown & Lawrence Knopp, “Queering the Map” in Annals of the Association of American Geographers (2008).

Northwest Lesbian and Gay History Project Historical Map of Seattle
The map charts sites of historical importance of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) folks over the Twentieth Century in Seattle. It features nearly 200 venues that include bars, community groups, religious congregations, protest sites, and early group homes and apartments. “Claiming Space” illustrates the shift of the community from Pioneer Square towards Capitol Hill and beyond, but also includes insets on other areas such as Queen Anne Hill, Wallingford, and the University District. The map illustrates both the concentration and dispersion of LGBT experience in the city, demonstrating how the geography and history of this community are thoroughly intertwined. Those who think the geography of gay Seattle is confined to Capitol Hill will be surprised by this map.
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Peter Greenaway, A Walk Through H. The Reincarnation of an Ornithologist, 1978

Posted in artists, maps by Owen on January 28, 2010
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